Top 6 Challenging Conditions the Foreigners May Encounter in China

Editor:May| Resource:AT0086.com

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You must have so many problems to cope with in China whose culture, custom and living habit is totally different from yours. Here we sort out 6 most challenging conditions the foreign people may encounter and be sure make a good preparation before you arrival in China.
You must have so many problems to cope with in China whose culture, custom and living habit is totally different from yours. Here we sort out 6 most challenging conditions the foreign people may encounter and be sure make a good preparation before you arrival in China.
 
1. Different Living Standard
Because China is a developing country, living conditions and standards are considerably lower than in the West. What your employer considers “suitable and customary housing,” will most likely not meet with your Western definition of it. Plan on the need to hire a cleaning service to scrub down your apartment shortly after arrival or mentally prepare to do it yourself (you can hire a good cleaning lady to come in for several hours per week for about 24 dollars per month). For the most part, furnishings are stark and utilitarian only. As a rule, only the bathroom will have hot running water provided by a hot water heater wall-unit connected to a shower head attached to the wall, with no shower stall or curtain. You will need to buy a sponge mop to push the water down a drain after taking a shower.
 
2. Lack of Entertainments
There is only one English-speaking television station in China; CCTV-9 and not all cable companies carry it as part of basic service. Many of expats rely on the abundance of cheap (pirated) DVDs available in China for entertainment. You can plan on purchasing a DVD player. You can bring your stereo to China if you want, but you also bring an adapter. China uses alternating current of 220V. Please plan accordingly.
 
3. Different Social Value
Keep in mind that Westerners typically operate from an internal-locus of control whereas the Chinese operate far more on an external-locus of control. That is, Westerners greatly value independence, autonomy and self-determination (and believe that success is mostly the result of hard work) whereas Chinese put far greater emphasis on luck, group norms and “fitting-in” (and believe that success is mostly the result of good luck and who you know through networking relationships, I.e., “guanxi”). Whereas Westerners are far more likely to assume responsibility for their mistakes and actions, and are quick to apologize for wrongdoings, the Chinese are far more likely to attribute their faults to a “misunderstanding” on your part and are extremely reticent to apologize as this constitutes a considerable loss of face, i.e., “mianzi”). The best way to handle this situation is to “give” the Chinese face by agreeing to the presence of a “misunderstanding.” In this way, you have “earned” considerable relationship points and are technically “owed” at a later time (and this is one very good way to build guanxi).
 
4. Different Style and Manner
It is very important not to attribute the same type of motivation to the Chinese that we naturally would to a Westerner. One of things was found very difficult to adjust to was the manner in which organizational bureaucracy affects even the simplest of requests. Sometimes a simple request will not be responded to because the wrong person was addressed and he/she did not want to lose face by directing you to the right person. (And, at other times, depending on the employer, you are actually being ignored and disregarded. But, sometimes, knowing the difference can be a very difficult call and learning that difference is often simply the result of experience and biding your time. If you don’t already have an enormous amount of patience before arriving in China, you will either develop it or you will eventually leave the country in frustration.) The Chinese simply operate on a very different timetable than westerner do and there is no getting away from that.
 
5. Different Building Construction
Only buildings taller than eight floors seem to have elevators. For some, this is an opportunity to get some exercise.
 
6.  Different Personal Value
China is grossly overpopulated and, as such, personal space is at a premium. Expect people to occasionally cut in front of you while you are waiting in lines. You can either accept it or quietly, gently but decidedly reclaim your space – the latter is readily accepted because it is understood.

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